26 Jun 2017

Edale Village, Derbyshire

Continuing from my last blog post.....
After leaving Tideswell we drove back into Hope Valley and then along the Vale of Edale to the village itself. It's a long lane covering several miles from Hope village to Edale, but there are magnificent hills on either side and this makes the area such a popular place for walking. On one side is the River Noe and on the other are the hills that include Kinder Scout made famous in 1932 when ramblers walked there as a peaceful mass trespass to highlight the fact that at the time access to areas of the open countryside, 'the lungs' for those living in the smoky industrial cities, were denied them. Further freedom-to-roam rallies were held in the area, but it was not until 1951 that the Peak District National Park was created, being the first in the UK. These days there are designated footpaths so that walkers can enjoy the experience of a ramble in the countryside.
From Hope onwards there are few farm buildings or cottages, although there are one or two places for walkers to stay over night. There are several 'booths' in the Vale.  A booth was originally a cattle-rearing place usually a shed or stone building to provide shelter. In the 13th century they were called 'vaccaries', but were also places where sheep were kept.  




The Trans Pennine train route runs through the Vale these days and there's a station near Edale village.


We passed the station, the Ramblers Inn  (where we sometimes stop for refreshments and something to eat) and this time came to the village which is a dead end, but where the villagers and visitors have most of the facilities they might need;  the village stores, the school, the church and the inn. 

The Ramblers Inn

the village school




The 16th century Old Nag's Head was on the packhorse route that headed in several directions.   Horses would carry raw wool, yarns and woven pieces in the panniers on the horses back and The Old Nag's Head building was a smithy and then an overnight stopping place with accommodation for the packhorse men.   The Old Nag's Head is now the official starting point for the Pennine Way footpath from Edale to Kirk Yetholm in Scotland which attracts walkers from far and wide.  The trail is 297 miles long across beautiful countryside and how I would like to go just a short way along it! I chatted to one walker who had been staying overnight at the inn who originally came from England and now lives in Boston, Massachusetts who was doing the Pennine Way walk in his retirement.  He said it would take him three weeks or more to get to the end in Scotland.  At least so far the weather has been on his side and I do admire those who can go trekking and hill walking.  It must be a wonderful experience walking in unspoilt places with breathtaking views from the top of those hills. 


Instead we went into the Nag's Head for a welcome drink and a substantial lunch of fish and chips.
I left Mr. P to finish his drink and rest after our morning's walk-about in Tideswell and I went for a walk towards the woods where a stream runs down the hills and along the land behind the pub and cottages. 





The narrow packhorse bridge crosses the Grindsbrook.  The walls of the bridge are low so that the panniers on the horse could clear the top of it easily.






These were the views from the top of the stone steps of Kinder Edge and The Nab Hill.



Instead of walking upwards there looks like a good footpath that leads back to the Ollerbrook Booth area, the lane back into the Hope Valley and then beyond where there are other moorlands and different challenging hill-walking trails.


Instead I went back to the village and joined Mr. P. for a look at the church.


The Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the third that has been built in Edale. Before that a chapel, which was later rebuilt, stood on a site within the old graveyard on the opposite side of the lane.  The present church is built of stone quarried from Nether Tor east of the Pennine Way at the top of Grindsbrook and the stone foundation was laid in May 1885 and consecrated in 1886.  The tower took 4 years to build. 



Leaving Edale it's possible to take a circular route back through the spectacular Winnats Pass and then take the road into Castleton.  This is one of our favourite places that we're drawn to time-and-again.


We had a quiet weekend and I hope you did also.  I think I've found out the best size of photo to edit for Blogger using a new editing programme, which I'm getting used to! There's nothing much I can do about photos I've uploaded onto the blog in the past except they take up too much room and probably slow down my laptop. I'm trying to declutter my files when I can.I don't know if visitors have problems viewing my blog. I'm thinking about getting a new laptop - eventually.  Meanwhile I carry on blogging as before (as and when I can) in order that I have some sort of a journal that might also be of interest to others.
Wishing everyone a good day.  Thank you for coming by,
Linda :)

24 comments:

  1. every singles photo you showed today is walking in unspoilt places with breathtaking views to me. the stone buildings and pathways and each and every thing here is wonderful to me. nothing at all like I see here and I love it.. thanks for the walkabout

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed the walk Sandra.

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  2. What a beautiful part of the country. We always try to get in some walks when we visit England, but can't imagine doing a long distance one.

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    1. Quite an achievement to complete a long distance walk. It must be satisfying to do that.

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  3. What a beautiful tour you took us on. I loved seeing the old church, such a joy.

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    1. It was a lovely walk in that shady area and along the lane to the church. It's always good to be able to go in because a church is left open for visitors.

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  4. What a lovely post to read and look at.
    It felt so peaceful as I sat at my computer just admiring the scenes, what a fabulous place, it really makes me want to go and visit.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thank you Jan. All the best to you too.

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  5. You should work for the Tourist Board. I just want to get in the car and drive up there!

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  6. So lovely, as always!, to go travelling with you and to get to see places that I would probably never visit otherwise. A really nice day out with you! Glad you enjoyed it too.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it. It's good to be able to visit one another this way and get to places that we wouldn't otherwise visit for real.

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  7. What a beautifully peaceful place to visit. It's like stepping back in time.
    Have a wonderful week :)

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    1. It's an out-of-the-way village yet remains unspoilt despite its popularity with hill walkers passing through. I hope you have a good week yourself.

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  8. Blue skies in the Pennines... Wow! Lovely photos. Jx

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    1. We try and choose good weather for going that way although often it can be wet and misty.

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  9. I don't have any problems accessing your blog.
    I'm with Rusty Duck, you sure sold it to me too. What a heavenly place, my kind of country. I loved it all, but that little house with the steps ....sighs....xxx

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    1. That's good re. accessing and viewing my blog. Thank you Dina for visiting and leaving a message.

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  10. Always my pleasure.xxx

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  11. Preciosos paisajes. Saludos.

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    1. Thank you Teresa for your visit and kind comment.

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  12. A great destination to enjoy walking about in. Lovely photos. I'm now in the mood to visit a pub and enjoy a meal and a brew. Have a nice rest of the week.

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    1. Thank you Ellen. Enjoy the rest of the week whatever you're doing.

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