3 Oct 2016

Worsbrough Flour Mill and Reservoir

Sometime ago we went to Worsbrough to visit a working flour mill which is located next to Worsbrough Reservoir.  We toured the mill and then had a walk some way around the reservoir, or at least the younger members of the family walked further than I did that day.  Looking back I'm pleased that I'm much fitter now and can do more walking. Nevertheless, it was a good afternoon.
There are guided tours of the mill by 'the miller' and lots of fun things for children to do such as the learning trail about Worsbrough and mill with clues to solve along the way. There's also a café with tables and benches so that visitors can sit outside in good weather and also a small shop where bags of flour, preserves, other related food and souvenirs can be purchased.  It's well worth a visit.




The oldest part of the mill dates back to 1625, probably when Thomas Edmunds, the heir to Worsbrough Estate arranged for it to be built.





Visitors that look around the mill are actually standing in the extension that was built in 1840, the 'New Mill'.  At this time millstones could be either driven by the waterwheel or a newly installed James Watt steam engine.



Some interesting families lived and worked in the mill over the centuries.
William and Ann Shaw were millers during a time of prosperity for the mill.
During this time engineers and navvies were cutting a canal
and constructing the reservoir outside. The valley and fields disappeared as
they filled up with water and came within yards of the mill.
William died in 1806, while Ann lived on till 1819.


The fireplace with initials and dates carved into the stone including William Shaw's.



Reg Steel
The Steel family came to Worsbrough in the 1920s because their mill in Sheffield has been demolished
to make way for another reservoir.  They were a big family and the mill was extended by them to give them more room.  When the head of the family, George, died his brother, Reg, took over and other brothers ran a threshing business in the yard. Reg had developed a hearing loss during WWI and  was probably troubled by the noise of the machinery in the mill so wore a balaclava which got caked white with flour when he was working.



The mill pond behind the mill is where the water runs off
to be used in the mill to turn the mill wheel.



The mill pond then runs into another water outlet and pond below
as well as into the reservoir.






Across the other side of the reservoir is a bird hide and a place for leisure fishing.


the bird hide



 I could see in the distance on the hills above the reservoir a large country house.  I'm not sure which one it is although I looked on a map. Something to research more fully and perhaps visit in the future?



Wishing you a good week at the beginning of this new month and better times if life has been difficult lately.  I'm hoping for the best for myself too as I continue with the second week of my daily radiotherapy treatment.  Once more thank you for your kind thoughts and your messages left on my blog,
Linda :)

19 comments:

  1. Looks like a great place to visit, you certainly took us on a great tour. Hoping the treatments are not to harrowing and that you will be back to 'normal' soon. Take care, you are in my prayers.

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    1. Thank you, I'm doing well so far. glad you enjoyed the tour of the mill.

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  2. I've had Worsbrough Mill on my list of places to visit for quite some time now, it looks really interesting. I think your mystery house is Wentworth Castle. Hope the radiotherapy is going well.

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    1. Thank you Jo and thank you for the information that the country house might be Wentworth Castle. I did wonder as it looks like it from photos I've seen of it, but didn't know that is was so close to Worsborough.

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  3. Mills fascinate me, what a great place to visit. Hope the week goes well, take care.

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    1. The working mill was very interesting and I shall go back sometime as I didn't take everything in on that visit. It's also a good place to take a walk around the reservoir. We have started to explore new places in the area where are daughter has moved to yet not so far from Sheffield either. Thank you, Jessica, for your good wishes.

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  4. so glad you are able to walk more now. that is a good thing. I am able to walk more also and I am so thankful for it. beautiful country and I like the closeup of all the mill parts and sacks of flour.. I like that swan pic to...

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    1. Glad you're doing well yourself after your eye op., Sandra.

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  5. I have always dreamt of having a water mill. What an interesting post, I did enjoy it. I wishing you all the very best, hoping this week goes well for you.xxx

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    1. It would be interesting to restore an old water mill. I saw a tv programme about someone who did that - I think it was in Northumberland and it looked like dedicated work. I'm not sure I would want to live close to water these days of possible flash flooding and racing water in places where it would also be suitable to drive a water wheel.

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  6. Once again you've done such a bang-up job of taking us along on your outing, that I feel as if I was actually there. I hope we get to join you when you explore the beautiful country estate.

    Continuing prayers for your complete and speedy recovery.

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    1. Thank you Patsy.
      I'll certainly share if I get to visit that country house. The season is nearly over for visiting these estates although a few special events are held during holiday periods such as Christmas.

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  7. Lovely to see the mill and learn about its history. I grew up on a mill pond in New England. Sending best of wishes and prayers your way. xx Karen

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    1. Thank you, Karen, for your visit and for your prayers and good wishes. The mill pond location in New England where you grew up sounds interesting. I can imagine it was beautiful there.

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  8. Watermills and reservoir are wonderful places to visit. I love the swan's reflection.
    Stay well Linda x

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    1. I know you enjoy being near reservoirs and other watery places. Thank you for your good wishes. All the best to you dear Prunella and to your friends too.

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  9. So happy your energy is returning. Good luck with continuing treatments. How I love visiting old mills and this one looks oh so special.

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  10. What fun to get to learn so much history about a place and that people that lived and worked there!

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    1. Someone has been busy researching the history of the mill. As well as seeing the grain being ground into flour which visitors can buy it's interesting to know more about the people who lived and worked there.

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