2 Jul 2015

The Gardens at Chatsworth (1)


The Cascade and the Temple

Chatsworth Estate covers a vast area and we could go there and see more of it every time we visit. When we lived in the south of England we would come up and stay in the area just to visit Chatsworth and also visit our daughter and family at the same time. Now we're fortunate to be able to visit more often.

The gardens have developed over many centuries and several of the Devonshires, have left a wonderful legacy through their interest in garden design and horticulture. The 1st Duke of Devonshire created a new formal garden in a classical style which was fashionable at the time in other important gardens across Europe. The revival of Greek and Roman ideas influenced the Duke's planting and ornamental features in the gardens such as the Temple and Cascade (above), especially in the area around the great house where guests could view them from the new State Apartment. These building projects featuring water displays required engineering skills and took many years to construct. Each step in the Cascade is different so that the sound of the water changes as it falls. It was completed in 1711, four years after the Duke's death.  Then a fashion for a natural-looking landscape meant that the gardens changed and over time new features were added so that a visitor today can wander around and enjoy both the formal and informal aspects of this great estate.


We planned beforehand what we wanted to see during our visit;  the glasshouses, the kitchen gardens, the arboretum, the Rockery and the wild area along by the trout stream.  The trout stream and the Rockery Gardens were part of Dan Pearson's inspiration for a show garden, the Laurent-Perrier Garden, which won a Gold Medal and Best in Show Award at the Royal Horticultural Society's 2015 Show at Chelsea, London. Later in the year and into 2016 the Chatsworth gardeners and the garden designer will work on an area by the stream using many of the features and plants seen at Chelsea.

As there's so much to share I'll be doing a series of posts on this visit starting with the kitchen gardens and this post highlights the beautiful peonies growing there.


   The main kitchen garden with a view below of The Stables, now a Visitor Centre.


Many varieties of peonies are growing along the pathways in one area of the kitchen gardens.






Peony Crimson Glory

Peony Barrymore

Peony A.F.W. Hayward

Peony Shirley Temple


Peony Kelway's Magestic

Peony Lord Kitchener


I took these photos at the end of our tour of the gardens when we were ready for a sit down with a sandwich and a cool drink so I didn't note all the names of the different varieties although there were labels underneath the bushes. Shirley Temple, being white, was rather difficult to photograph.  As you can see I got snap happy!



Do take a seat and sit for a while.....
To be continued..........



25 comments:

  1. Oh I am in love with this place and the kitchen garden. I did like Shirley Temple, but my favorite is Barrymore. More peonies are needed in my garden. I do love them so. Thanks for the walk and then a chance to sit awhile.

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    1. Seeing so many varieties of the peony massed together was a treat. There are tree peonies growing in other areas of the gardens.

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  2. Wonderful. I've never been to Chatworth but we don't really live that far away, it's on my list though. I've never grown peonies but I remember there being a really dark red one in our garden when I was a child, I remember always being fascinated by the buds, the petals so tightly packed in that tight ball. There looks to be a good selection at Chatsworth, I think Crimson Glory is my favourite if I had to pick one.

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    1. I like the cup shape before the flower fully opens out on some varieties. The Kelway's Magestic and the pale pink with many petals are my favourites.

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  3. those flowers are just gorgeous and I love the Lord Kitchner. the number 2 photo of the fountain and the wall is fantastic... i love stone walls and you have them here, like the one in your header.

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    1. The kitchen garden is enclosed by high hedges and a stone wall with woods behind at the top of the hill which helps to protect the fruit, vegetables and flowers from the wind.

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  4. These are such lovely photos you shared today. You are so lucky to live in such a historic area. I believe I saw a documentary recently on this property. Imagine the past of those who lived there.it's fascinating.

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    1. I'm always aware of all those who created the house and gardens and continue to maintain the estate today. Also the people who lived there in the past.

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  5. I adored Chatsworth when I went! Your photos are really beautiful! Full of light and air. X

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    1. There are several gardens in our region that I love and Chatsworth is one of them. There's always something new to see with exhibits in the house and the gardens have so many interesting areas to explore.

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  6. Chatsworth is appropriately known as the Palace of the Peak - I loved seeing your photos - Chatsworth is part of my childhood, seeing it always takes me back. Did you notice the gold-leaf that now adorns the outside of the windows? I think it was done about three years ago. Apparently when the house was first built the windows were done like that, so it has now been reinstated to its original glory.
    Wonderful collection of peonies.

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    1. Yes, I took some photos of the gold leaf around the windows and the gold leaf adorning the ball-shapes on the pillars of the front terrace walls. We've already done a tour of the house and took lots of photos. Speaking to another visitor I understand that there are some new and interesting modern exhibits. I shall be posting about the exterior of the house and the formal gardens after writing about the kitchen gardens and the trout stream. You must know Chatsworth very well.

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  7. Gosh, it's worth going just for those peonies.....what a stunning display! The house and gardens do look ever so grand...xxx

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    1. Chatsworth is a treasure house and the estate is vast. You can park in some areas of the estate for a small fee and go for a walk using the public footpaths if you don't want to go into the house and gardens.

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  8. Such a long time since I've been into Chatsworth House and Gardens - I remember the cascade. The peonies are so beautiful and so many varieties to see. I'm looking forward to more posts about your visit:)

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    1. There's a lot to see at Chatsworth so we find that we have to pace ourselves when we visit.

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  9. Sigh......another wonderful place we still have to visit......So many different peonies, lovely.

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    1. The peonies were beautiful and something I didn't expect to see, but there are always good surprises at every turn in these beautiful gardens.

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    2. Hi Linda, the place seems a paradise. It is so beautiful that I could smell the peonies! Shirley Temple peony is amazing. The kitchen garden is lovely!

      Sandra xx

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    3. Hello Sandra. I'm sure peonies must be a favourite flower for you.

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  10. Beautiful! I love peonies and didn't realize there were so many, many varieties.

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    1. Hello Jody. The collection of peonies in the kitchen garden was exceptional. It was good to see so many varieties in one place. Tree peonies are grown elsewhere in the gardens.

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  11. Absolutely lovely, Linda! Have a delightful month of July! Bess

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    1. Thank you Bess. I hope you have a lovely July.

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  12. So beautiful! The Cascade is so lovely; I never would have thought you could make it sound different at the different levels.

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