19 Jul 2015

A drive to Hathersage, Derbyshire



We pass one end of Ladybower Reservoir every time we spend time visiting the villages in the Hope Valley and I've always wanted to see it from above so recently we decided to take a different route on our way to Hathersage.  This took us up a lane on the slopes of Bamford Edge and then on towards Stanage Moor before making a descent into Hathersage.



On one side was Bamford Edge.





On the other (above) we could see across to Hope Valley (marked by the X), but unfortunately the woods in full leaf obscured Ladybower Reservoir and the River Derwent.  We would have had to find a way up to the rocky escarpment and then we would probably have seen the reservoir.


Nevertheless it was an impressive view (above) and knowing the landmarks we could see Castleton in the distance beyond the distinctive tower of a cement works and even the ruins of Peveril Castle (marked with an X)  and Mam Tor. Below us was the village of Bamford.





Stanage Edge and Moor





After driving some way along the ridge of a hill we were able to stop in the lane and see Hathersage in the valley below.



We could see the spire of St Michael's and All Angels Church, the walled kitchen garden and part of the cemetery.  I've written about this and the Charlotte Bronte connection here.



On Besom Lane is a row of cottages with small windows at the top.  This floor was once a button factory.  Conditions would have been bad for the health as workers breathed in metal dust that would have been present in the air especially in the needle making industry in the village mills.



Down in the village we parked in The Dale near Dale Brook and Mill. The Mill was a small works producing metal buttons, pins and needles in the 18th and early 19th centuries.  Here we sat and had a sandwich and some bottled water to drink before a walk up Church Bank to visit the church.








Views from Church Bank





The shaft of an ancient cross

It's well dressing and gala festival season and we had come to see the decorated pictures made from natural materials that are erected near the brooks and wells in thanksgiving for the abundance of water in the county. Donations go to a good cause. The designs change each year and are chosen to represent a Biblical theme, depict an aspect of that particular village or commemorate a national event.


This year the primary school's theme was the commemoration of Victory in Europe Day (8th May 1945) 70th anniversary.







At the Methodist Church there was another thought-provoking theme.




After our time in Hathersage we drove back through part of Hope Valley, through Bamford, passing Ladybower Reservoir again. 





The school holidays start this week. We're looking forward to more family time over the rest of the Summer months and have plans for a long break in the Autumn.  I shall be blogging, but not posting quite so often and still hope to keep up with your news.
Wishing you peaceful Summer days,
Linda :)



30 comments:

  1. i love the stone walls and buildings and those puddled art works are really special... the views are spectacular. and next time you go bring me the Hunger Lane and i can put it in my drive way because it seems I am always hungry, or think i am

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    1. On my side bar Labels list you can click on 'well dressing' and see examples from my visit to villages in past years.

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  2. All very scenic. It's a lovely part of the world you live in Linda.

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    1. We certainly live in a beautiful area.

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  3. Such beautiful views and I love that name, Hungry Lane. I've never actually seen any well dressings, I'm going to make a real effort to see some next year, I think I've just about run out of time this year. They look fabulous, so much work must have gone in to producting them.

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    1. 'Hungry Lane' is an intriguing name. The tradition of well dressing is interesting and it's fascinating to see how the boards are made up. Buxton has a big festival and is a good one to go to, but the small villages also produce beautiful designs and pictures.

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  4. I do so love the well dressings and one day I'd love to see them live! Your photos are beautiful and that reservoir side one is just stunning!x

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    1. I hope you get to a well dressing some day. I enjoyed seeing the children's design using so many different natural materials.

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  5. We have stayed in Hathersage at the George Hotel which I think I could just see in one of your photos. Apart from spending time in the glorious countryside around that area we like to visit David Mellor's Visitor Centre, browse his wares and have something to eat and drink in the café. Of course, David Mellor died a few years ago, but his son, Corin, carries on the family tradition creating new contemporary designs.

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    1. Yes, the George Hotel can be seen in one of the pictures. We almost went into the David Mellor Centre when we were near Froggatt Edge as it's another place on the list to visit and have some refreshments. I'm sure we shall get there some time.

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  6. It is funny how we can go past places and never visit, so it is great that you decided not to drive past this day and go and visit. Looks as though it was well worth it as it is all very beautiful and with such pretty buildings to see as well. Glad that you went a different way and had a good time! xx

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    1. There are many more new country lanes to explore where we live as well as those areas we return to time-and-again on familiar routes! Either way, there are some beautiful places to visit in this part of England.

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  7. Beautiful photos, Linda of your journey to and from Hathersage and in the village itself. All these places which once were a hive of industry are now so pretty and tranquil. The well-dressings are wonderful such a lot of hard work and imagination goes into them. I've enjoyed visiting Hathersage with you:)

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this post as the area must be familiar to you. I always think of the contrast between the tranquility of Hathersage and similar villages today and what they must have been like when cottage industries and small mills were integral to the life of the village. It would have been a hard life for the cottagers.

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  8. So very English, these views, magnificent........ I love the landscape, the moors, the sheep, look at that one on the stone...., the villages and the history. Thank you for showing us around in Derbyshire.

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    1. We're fortunate to be right on the border with Derbyshire so we're frequently drawn back there. It's interesting to see the landscape as it changes with the seasons. The sheep were happy to be resting in the shade, wandering through the tall ferns or grazing on the moors.

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  9. grazie Linda per questo bel reportage..oltre la bellezza che i miei occhi hanno gustato grazie alle tue bellissime fotografie mi è parso di sentire l'aria fresca ...cosa di cui abbiamo veramente bisogno in questo periodo in Italia.....ti ringrazio per gli auguri che mi hai lasciato per la nascita di Elisa in occasione della tua visita al mio blog...goditi le vacanze e poi mostraci le tue bellissime foto e la tua splendida terra..

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    1. Thank you Dalmazia. I'm sure you're enjoying your new little grandchild, Elisa. I hope you're able to find cool places where you can relax during these hot Summer days. We're counting the days until our next trip to Italy this year.

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  10. What a beautiful village and drive. I loved it all, including the sheep and the artwork.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed coming along Marilyn. Have a good day!

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  11. I did enjoy the high views of those gorgeous rolling hills, I can't get enough of those!
    How very beautiful and tranquil this part of the country is......sighs....and not a person or car in sight, making it all the more special!
    I loved the wildflowers and the sheep...I also enjoyed refreshing myself with St Michael's and all Angels church.....fascinating for sure!
    You had me smiling eating your sarnies at Hungry Lane....but such history there too. Enjoy your family time Linda.xxx

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    1. Hello Dina. I'm glad you enjoyed the views and the walk in the village. Eating our sandwiches in the Dale near the Mill and the former workers' cottages next to Hungry Lane made me reflect upon the hard life of the cottagers in days gone by. Thank you re. family time and thinking of you and yours.

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  12. My, oh, my...you have so many country tours within your reach...with time for a sandwich somewhere along the line. Loved the sheep or ram standing on top of the rock....back a few pictures...

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    1. We certainly do live near beautiful countryside Becky and we're making the most of it.

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  13. You have taken me on another tour of lovely England. Such beautiful country with all that mixture of stone outcrops, green fields and moors, as well as the walk through the village. The info on Charlotte Bronte was very interesting (previous post). And the artwork all done with natural materials, very cool. I hope you enjoy seeing your family over the summer.

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    1. Thank you and I'm pleased you enjoyed the drive and walk around Hathersage. The Bronte connection is interesting since Charlotte would have walked from the vicarage around what is essentially the same unspoilt village and countryside.

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  14. I always love coming t your blog and sharing the countryside with you...thank you so much for sharing your day out...I have really enjoyed it.

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    1. Hello Tanya. Good to hear from you. I hope you're getting some free time this Summer.

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  15. Thank you for taking us with you on your journey to Hathersage. I very much enjoyed your photos of the English countryside and of the village and displays as well.

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    1. I'm glad you found Hathersage and the displays interesting. I think you and Betsy would enjoy walking in the Peak District.

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