7 Jun 2015

Gardening: June


the front garden


first bloom (Arthur Bell)


back garden



over the hedge - neighbourhood gardens











apple (above) and pear (below)


veronica






peas, broad beans, french beans, carrots, parsnips, sweet pepper, tomatoes, broccoli, rhubard, spinach, salad leaves, herbs, potatoes, garlic and shallots are in pots

mixed salad leaves and spinach
the covered yard (below)


nectarine grown from a stone (above) aubergines, cucumber, lemon, orange and olive saplings, sweet pepper, tomatoes, herbs, vines, flower cuttings



33 comments:

  1. You should be SO proud of this garden! It is truly a work of art!!x

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    1. Thanks Kezzie. Have a good week!

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  2. It is so great to see all that you have going on in your garden right now. So many lovely plants. Your peony is especially beautiful isn't it!!! xx

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    1. It's just a selection of what's happening in the garden and covered yard. The peonies always do well. We've thinned some out and given them to our daughter who has a new garden to establish.

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  3. all this beauty plus edibles to.. i am betting you spend lots and lots of time in your garden just admiring it

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    1. My husband is the one who does all the work. I'm the one who admires the result and, yes, we both enjoy being in the garden.

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  4. You have so many beautifully cared-for plants! I can't believe you can grow lemons and oranges and even olives -- how cool. And your peonies and lupines and roses are so pretty. I'm glad to get a chance to see how your own gardens are progressing. Thanks for sharing! -Beth

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    1. The olive tree was a gift, but the oranges and lemons were grown from seeds and it's possible they'll mature in the covered way. They were only grown for fun and the glossy foliage is lovely.

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  5. I shall have to send you my peonies - they never flower in my garden. I think they don't like to be facing North. It all looks very healthy and well cared for Linda - lots of work though!

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    1. The peonies started off in my mother's garden, which I inherited. They are a reminder of her and the family garden. I'm pleased that they flourished and began to produce flowers when we transferred to this present house.

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    2. P.S. I understand peonies are temperamental plants. Ours are facing S.W. in the back garden and S.E in the front and all the plants are sheltered by walls and hedges. The top soil is also quite rich and mixed with composted material.

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  6. It's all looking lovely and you've got tomatoes on your plants already. It looks like it's going to be a good year all round.

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    1. Let's hope so! As you can imagine, the more tomatoes the better in our house, either eaten raw or in pasta dishes.

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  7. You have some wonderful flowers and plants in your garden Linda, it is all looking lovely in June:)

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    1. I do love May and June for the flowers that we can enjoy in our British gardens. Our garden is beginning to get established and it's always a delight to see new plants and those produced from cuttings doing well. This year I'm pleased that plants such as the lupins have got to the stage of producing flowers. Other years they've been chewed up by slugs early in their growth!

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  8. It's looking good and obviously extremely productive. Most impressed with the nectarine! I might have to give that a go. Did you do anything special with the stone or just pop it in a pot?

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    1. Mr. P. put three in potting compost in a 15 inch pot transferring to bigger pots when necessary. Two have grown into trees, but only the one in a very large pot inside the covered yard has produced two nectarines. The tree is now four years old and has been pruned.It's the second year it has had flowers, but last year they dropped off so this year is the first time any flowers have developed into fruit. All the best if you have a go yourself!

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  9. Okay, that was most impressive. I will never, ever show you my garden. How much fun it must be to visit yours.

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    1. Julie, I would love you to visit! I think your garden would be interesting to see as I caught a glimpse of flowers in this month's scavenger hunt challenge. I enjoy seeing gardens around the world that are different from mine.

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  10. Nectarine from a stone eh? Wow! How productive your veggie patch is, everything is looking so productive and healthy! Your toms are way ahead of mine!!! Do you find that the carrots have been REALLY slow this year?
    Your roses look so beautiful and those peonies too....when the poppies pop it should be the icing on the cake!
    Your new greenhouse area looks as though it's always been there......can I say I'm a teeny teeny tiny bit jealous at how tidy and organised everything is???? Good on you I say!!!xxx

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    1. I shall pass the compliments on to Mr. P. who gets all the credit for the hard work in the garden. I make suggestions only and try and have a colour scheme for the flowering plants. There's a lot of gardening talk with the family too. I'm hoping we'll get good weather and not rain when the poppies 'pop'. Last year they and the peonies were spoilt by rain before they had a chance to look their best. Carrots have always been a challenge and have been slow this year. If we get any we'll be pleased! Dina, I LOVE your garden, especially your courtyard.

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  11. très beau panachage de fleurs
    je me désole avec mes lupins je n'arrive pas à en faire pousser

    et j'adore les giroflées
    bonne semaine
    tendresse

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  12. Thank you Edith (Iris). I'm sorry that your lupins didn't flower, but I'm sure that you have other beautiful flowers in your garden instead. I'm pleased with the wallflowers in my orange section of the flower bed. There are also the little Californian or Shirley poppies and there's also an orange geum that hasn't yet flowered. I think the orange wallflowers actually striking mixed with some of the red peonies.
    Have a good week!

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  13. What a blessing to have a husband who loves to garden. Everything is so lovely and you can look forward to a wonderful harvest as well. Tell your husband your pictures of his garden refreshed my eyes and gladdened my heart.

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    1. Thank you. I've passed on your kind comments to Mr. P. You have a beautiful garden with some lovely trees.

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  14. Quite a huge garden. It's absolutely lovely and also industrious! I esp. like the big, bright red flowers! Are they peonies?
    I've been off from blogging for awhile, but am now back. I retired officially June 1 and am loving it! I'm spending a day with the grandkids each week and have thoroughly enjoyed those days. I have the rest of my life to do my to-do list instead of having to have this summer's list done by Aug. 13 when my school district returns to school. :>)

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    1. Yes, the red flowers are peonies. The garden probably looks bigger in my photos than it is in reality. We have to be organised and we're limited to what we can grow because of the size. The covered way is very useful space as it's similar to a conservatory and provides shelter for some plants. All the best in your retirement. It's satisfying being available to spend extra time with grandchildren. I hope that your health improves now that you can have more time to rest.

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  15. Your garden is beautiful! The tomatoes in your garden are much further along than ours. We only have blossoms. The little yellow poppy I think is a Welsh Poppy. We recently became acquainted with that sweet little one and I have ordered seeds. Beautiful rose and peonies.

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    1. Thank you for the name of the poppy. I do love them and i'm looking forward to the white orientals opening. Also more roses blooming.

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  16. Imagine that you have a fruit on your nectarine grown from a seed - well done. There is a sense of timelessness and peace in the gardens at the moment with so much growth bursting forth, but seeing the autumn fruits already forming on your trees makes me realise how quickly time is marching on.

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    1. There seems to be such a burst of growth recently. It's good to enjoy this season in the garden whilst anticipating the harvesting of produce in the next. For us it's also of benefit that we can spend weeks at at time enjoying the English garden and my husband being able to tend the fruit and vegetables.

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  17. Hi Linda, The peonies, lupins, columbine and roses are all lovely! Your kitchen garden looks like it's going to be very productive this summer. :) I enjoyed seeing the nectarine tree. Very cool that you grew it yourself!

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  18. Your garden is thriving. Love all of the different colors you have!

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