6 Oct 2013

A trip to Northumbria (2)

                                                           Bamburgh Castle

On the Saturday of our trip our group drove along the coastal road to spend the day on Lindisfarne (Holy Island).  The plan was for some of the group to walk across the sands to the island when the tide was out and the rest of us to drive over on the causeway.
Since the tide wasn't going to be out until late morning we stopped off at Bamburgh for a coffee and a visit to St. Aidan's church.


Bamburgh was once the home of the ancient kings of Northumbria and Bamburgh Castle set on its promontory overshadows the village and is an impressive sight from every vantage point. One day we might get to visit the castle and walk the sandy beach beside it. The last time we came to Bamburgh it was pouring with rain so this time it was good to spend a little longer in the village on a beautiful sunny day.



                                                     
                                                    Carter's is a renowned butcher's shop




There's a grove of trees on the village green with a long-standing 'rookery'.  There's a saying in the village that if the rooks go elsewhere that will be the end of Bamburgh!






Bamburgh was also the home of Grace Darling, the young woman who at the age of 22 years rowed across perilous seas in 1838 t0 rescue survivors from a ship that had wrecked against Big Harcar Rock in the Farne Islands.  She was not only brave, but unassuming. Soon this young girl who had been brought up on two remote lighthouses became a national heroine. The Royal National Lifeboat Institution's Grace Darling Museum is well worth a visit (we did so last time we came to Bamburgh). It provides an opportunity to learn more about Grace, her family and the area where she lived.


Opposite the museum is St. Aidan's Church where on this site Aidan of Lindisfarne, an Irish monk and missionary built a wooden church and is the place where he died in 651 AD.  The present church is 800 years old.
In the churchyard is a memorial to Grace Darling which has been placed some distance to the north of her grave so that it might be within view for those who pass by the church by boat.








There are many beautiful relatively modern memorial windows in the church and an interesting embroidered piece of work made by members of the local Women's Institute depicting landmarks and sights around Bamburgh including those rooks and the puffins of the Farne Islands.







By the way, there's a new ITV television series, Inside the National Trust, that has just started on a Sunday just after mid day.  The work of the wildlife wardens on the Farne Islands who look after the bird colonies there is also being featured. The Farne Islands Blog is also an interesting look at the behind the scenes life of the National Trust Wildlife Rangers there.

More about our time on Lindisfarne next time. Until then, hope your week goes well!


19 comments:

  1. What a beautiful place and so many interesting aspects to it. The embroidered work is fantastic and I love those memorial windows.

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    1. I was really pleased that our group organisers had planned to stop for a while in Bamburgh and we were able to look around the village. Last time we missed out on visiting the church and churchyard, too.

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  2. I would love to live in that rounded room on the castle in the first photo. love the castle, but that room is MINE.. and that little stone house would make me happy and that copper kettle window makes me happy looking at the photo plus the kettle in the next photo is so beautiful.. lots and lots of things i love today.....

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    1. Glad you enjoyed seeing something of Bamburgh, Sandra.

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  3. Lovely. I would like to walk across to Lindisfarne. How far is it? Did you? Perhaps we will see more of that to come.

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  4. The walk across the wet sands takes longer than one might think - a couple of hours. There are poles to mark the way and you have to be aware of the tides. Only a few of the group did the walk and as my husband and I had been driven to Northumbria we went across the causeway, which gave us more time on the island.

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  5. I've enjoyed looking at all your photos! It is such a long time since we visited Bamburgh and the castle I remember it was cold and windy so it was lovely to see the village in sunshine:)

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    1. The weather does make a difference to any trip. Sunny is good, but sometimes the atmosphere on the coast can be very dramatic at other times.

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  6. It looks like a lovely village, the castle looks like something from a Harry Potter film, so oldy worldy. What a lovely place to visit, you do go to the best places!

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    1. There are some beautiful places in the UK and castles on the coast are always enjoyable to visit.

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  7. Lovely photos Linda and your visit looked so interesting. Do you know, I was only talking to my friend the other day about an island with a castle that you had to walk out to and it was in the north of England, and just couldn't think of the name. Thanks for this post as I now remember it. I'd love to go there sometime.
    Patricia x

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    1. I hope you manage to get to Lindisfarne some time in the future, Patricia.

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  8. What a charming place, full of lovely old stone. I loved the stain glass wondows.....here's hoping the rooks stay eh? Lovely post.xxxx

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    1. Bamburgh is well worth a visit. I'm sure the locals take a keen interest in the rookery in the middle of the village, Snowbird!

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  9. c'est absolument splendide
    quel beau château , il a l'air énorme et cette légende est des plus agréable
    on ne se lasse jamais de visiter votre blog
    des visites assise cela me convient bien:::
    tendresse
    edith (iris)

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    1. Thank you Iris. Always good to hear from you.

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  10. The windows in the church and the church are beautiful.
    Did you have tea at the Copper Kettle. A friend just wrote on
    her blog about tearooms at National Trust locations and the cakes
    they serve. They all sounded so good.

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  11. Yes we did, Marilyn. National Trust properties are well known for their delicious home made cakes so often worth having refreshments in the tearooms.

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  12. I've visited Bamburgh Castle but not the village, so it was fun to remedy the omission with your fascinating post, Linda.

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