4 May 2013

Renishaw Hall, Derbyshire: (1)


Yesterday I went to Renishaw Hall, Derbyshire, the home of the Sitwells for nearly 400 years. It has become well-known in recent times through the writings of Edith, Osbert and Sacheverell Sitwell. It is still the family home and some of the rooms are open for tours on a Friday afternoon. Although I have visited the gardens before, I wanted to see the house and take a walk in the grounds during the short season when the bluebells are in bloom.



The bluebells in the woodland areas have just come into flower and were a delight to see as was the rest of the gardens, both the informal and formal.



In the woodlands the camellias are in bloom as well as some magnolias.


A carpet of daffodils in the lime tree avenue was a cheerful sight on a rather cloudy day.



The tulips, forget-me-knots and other spring flowers are out in the formal gardens.


On the top lawn there were some playful rabbits (or hares).


At the moment, if you are in the UK you can see Renishaw Hall featured on a programme called Country House Sunday early on a Sunday morning on the itv channel or catch up on the series on iplayer replays.

14 comments:

  1. I haven't seen any bluebells in flower yet, in fact, mine are only just pushing up through the soil. The daffodls have put on such a lovely display this year, it must be because of the cold start to the year, they seem to have lasted ages.

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  2. Hi Linda, The bluebells, camellias, and magnolias are just stunning! I have two types of bluebells in my gardens: English bluebells, like yours, and Virginia bluebells. I'm not sure if they are actually related to each other. I think not; I think they just share their common name. I enjoy your blog, Linda. The UK has always fascinated me. I spent 3 days in London 15 years ago and I hunger for a lot more UK travel!
    xo Beth

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  3. Looks a great place for a visit. We have some bluebells starting to show through in our garden. Lovely.

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  4. There's so much history in the midst of a new season.

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  5. It looks lovely. Bluebell woods are amazing especially when there are lots of bluebells filling the air with perfume!

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  6. Those gardens are beautiful, Linda, and I do love bluebells. I lived within walking distance of a noted bluebell wood as a child and still have such vivid memories of the glory of that carpet of blue. Interestingly I saw a short item about Renishaw Hall on TV last week, yet before that I had never heard of it.

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  7. I just love seeing bluebells and daffodils grown naturalized. However, you might think I am strange, but I do not like the bluebells in my yard. They just take over everywhere. Tomorrow I will digging bluebells. Loved seeing these beautiful gardens.

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  8. So glad you had a lovely time - I just love bluebells and it looks like they are out now - we only spotted a few on our walk last week. Those rabbits or hares are lovely:)

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  9. Bellissime immagini, stupenda visita, amo tantissimo questi fiori. Un abbraccio
    Emi

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  10. Such glorious gardens at Renishaw Hall.. The Bluebells are so sweet to look at.. Thanks for sharing all the flowers of their gardens. Love the Hares... Hugs Judy

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  11. Oh what amazing gardens, I simply love them. How wonderful that the bluebells are out, they are such a stunning little flower, so dainty and delicate.
    I do love those rabbits/hares!xxxx

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  12. Hi Linda,

    How beautiful the gardens are with all the gorgeous bluebells, Spring bulbs and the cute rabbits.
    Must have been delightful walking around here.
    Hope that you have a wonderful bank holiday with lovely weather

    hugs
    Carolyn

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  13. Just lovely! What abundant beauty you enjoy in England.
    Cindy

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  14. oh ! c' est génial les lapins
    j'adore
    merci de cette promenade
    à travers l'Angleterre
    les daffodils , me font penser
    aux poètes des laks
    bonne journée
    tendresse
    edith(iris)

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