8 Aug 2012

Haddon Hall - The Fountain Terrace: lilies



Last week I spent the day with a friend at Haddon Hall near Bakewell in Derbyshire looking around the house and gardens.  The Manners family have owned Haddon since 1567 although there has been a building on the site since Norman times.

Entries in the Haddon account book in 1582 suggests that a famous Elizabethan architect, Robert Smythson designed the house and gardens featuring stone balustrades and steps and a lower lawn.  In the 17th century several terraced areas were laid out which was a typical arrangement for a late Renaissance garden inspired by Italian hill-top villa designs.

The second terrace

The Fountain Terrace
The south side of Haddon Hall.  The Long Gallery overlooks
the Fountain Terrace


Two years ago a renowned garden designer, Arne Maynard, began a new planting scheme in the herbaceous borders on the Fountain Terrace and plants that would have been seen in an Elizabethan garden have been used.  Climbing roses, clematis and lilies as well as other flowers bloom in abundance from mid-June.  

                                     Here are some of the beautiful lilies in the garden.
                           






6 comments:

  1. What beautiful gardens! Incredible that one family has owned the lands for so long and can still afford to maintain and improve them.

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  2. The fact that Haddon has been owned by one family for so long is part of the charm of its character and, of course, the setting.
    Haddon has played host to many major film and television dramas including Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre and The Other Boleyn Girl as well as to the general public.

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  3. Oh, how gorgeous, Relindis! I've only visited Haddon Hall once, on a history trip from school nearly 50 years ago. I still remember being very impressed by the house, though I can't say the gardens made the same impression on me at that age. :-)

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  4. The Elizabethan garden seems like a visualization of the walled-in and locked away garden in The Secret Garden---the climbing roses esp. I reread that book this past year---reinforced what I already knew: getting outside and working with the earth is a balm to one's soul and a tremendous healer.
    These photos are beautiful, friend.

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  5. each and everyone of these photos fits the title of our blog perfectly, my favorite today is number 7. wow on that one. and the first 3 are really rich tapestries.

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  6. What a joy it would be to visit there. The lilies are especially beautiful.

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